Free Daily Lesson Planners to Help Teachers Stay Organized This Semester

As parents, students, young adults, and academic professionals prepare for the return to school, many are trying to make sure that most "t's" are crossed and "i's" are dotted with course materials, tools, transportation, and anything else that factors into the mix when getting ready to start another school-year.

One of the most important factors when it comes to success in the classroom is organization. I'm sure many of us can remember a time when either we've been students in a class that wasn't properly planned for the day, or taught a class but without having our activities well-outlined. Either way, today's post is geared towards helping teachers be prepared when entering the classroom this semester through free daily lesson planners for each day of the week.

Additionally, in May we put together a list of 9 smart productivity hacks for teachers that's a must-read when it comes to organizing documents, utilizing technology to engage students, and also using online tools to maximize efficiency for grading. And if instructors find themselves overwhelmed with trying to schedule meetings with students and avoiding conflicts, setting up a web scheduler for office hours is another great idea to help them stay on track. And since you're here with us today, we also have a nifty short list of 4 creative ways how teachers can help students be more accountable and engaged in the classroom. Check them out! 

 
Have students find a partner to help keep them accountable

Have students find a partner to help keep them accountable

1. Establish accountability partners

Something different that I came across last semester was the idea of students at the beginning of the school year partnering up and having accountability partners throughout the semester. I thought that this was a really good and helpful idea in terms of motivation and completion. Some students are great starters, but don't stay motivated to perform well and complete their work up until the end of the semester. This would be a wonderful idea for teachers to try during the first week of school to encourage students to perform well throughout the year and also realize that they're not on their own, but if in need of help there's someone they can reach out to.

 
Photo Courtesy of "https://quizlet.com/"

Photo Courtesy of "https://quizlet.com/"

2. Stir up their intellect with Quizlet

I personally ran into Quizlet years ago when studying for an exam, and recently heard of encouraging students to use their online tool for helping them to retain what's being taught in the classroom. Quizlet is a lot like it sounds - it's online software that allows students to create their own flashcards and choose a method of studying that works for them all while helping with the retention of course materials and preparation for exams.

 
Photo Courtesy of "https://getkahoot.com/"

Photo Courtesy of "https://getkahoot.com/"

3. Get them excited and involved with technology through Kahoot

No, we don't want them getting into cahoots and in trouble, but having fun with the online tool Kahoot which allows students to review and answer questions whether through a quiz, quick poll, or survey. I recently learned about this tool and believe that it would be a great addition to the classroom since students like using their phones anyway - let them use them to be productive and learn, why not?

 
Show students that their education is relevant to their professional success

Show students that their education is relevant to their professional success

4.  Help them realize how their education is relevant to their professional success

One question that I'm sure that pops up quite often is "How is learning 'x' going to help me in the real world?" or "When will I ever use 'x'?" Good questions, but one of the most important things that I believe teachers can do for their students is to make their learning extensible beyond the classroom & into the workforce. What do you mean, Jalesa? Find some way in your lesson plan to incorporate a skill that it is useful across all lines of work - whether that's getting students to break down a difficult concept and creating an infographic, having students work as team in putting together an oral and visual presentation, or facilitating a hands-on project that might involve working with the community. There are a number of ways that teachers can help students realize that their interpretation of a literary text doesn't stop at the door of the classroom - make their learning interesting & real, and I believe they'll remember that and carry it with them as they move forward.

 

And we hope those 4 creative tips will help to get you off to a more productive and fulfilling start this year. Now, if you're ready to go ahead and grab your daily lesson planners, click on the button below.

Let us know how you're incorporating these tips into your classrooms this semester and also how the planners are working for you. Feel free to share these with your friends & as always, happy scheduling (and happy organizing) as you set sails for a new school year!